GlobalPost delivers stories that inform and entertain, taking people to far flung places around the globe most will never visit but where events are shaping all of our lives.

Malala Yousafzai, the 17-year-old education campaigner from Pakistan, just won the Nobel Peace Prize. And everyone is super excited about that because Malala is super inspiring. Here is her story.
And here’s a look at some of the moving things she’s said since becoming one of the world’s most famous activists.

Malala Yousafzai, the 17-year-old education campaigner from Pakistan, just won the Nobel Peace Prize. And everyone is super excited about that because Malala is super inspiring. Here is her story.

And here’s a look at some of the moving things she’s said since becoming one of the world’s most famous activists.

newyorker:

In the early nineteen-seventies, a small group of photographers set out to document what they understood to be real British life. Take a look at their postcards, now on view as part of an exhibition of the Co-Optic archive at the Brighton Photo Biennial.
“Enoch Powell Electioneering,” 1970. Photograph by Paul Hill / Courtesy Brighton Photo Biennial.

newyorker:

In the early nineteen-seventies, a small group of photographers set out to document what they understood to be real British life. Take a look at their postcards, now on view as part of an exhibition of the Co-Optic archive at the Brighton Photo Biennial.

“Enoch Powell Electioneering,” 1970. Photograph by Paul Hill / Courtesy Brighton Photo Biennial.

reportagebygettyimages:

Disaster-Zone Midwives

Nearly a year after Typhoon Haiyan devastated central Philippines, the disaster is not over. An estimated 230,000 pregnant women live in affected areas, while over 800 women, often malnourished and suffering dehydration, high blood pressure, extreme trauma, inadequate shelter and lack of transportation give birth every day. There is limited or no access to emergency obstetric care. While the Philippine Rural and Municipal Health Centers are rebuilding they are crowded with the sick and injured, charge for maternity services and many maternity patients express not having a good experience there.

Under a canvas tent, in the skeleton of a destroyed elementary school, the organizations Bumi Sehat Foundation International and WADAH Foundation came together under the leadership of an American midwife, Robin Lim, to create Bumi Wadah birthing clinic in the township of Dulag, outside of Tacloban City in the Visayas. At this time it is the only clean, free, 24 hour maternity service. Laboring mothers travel from villages often hours away. Ms. Lim, along with local Filipina midwives and a rotation of foreign midwives, offer free prenatal care, birthing services and medical aid, delivering over 100 babies a month, without electricity or running water.

Reportage photographer Dana Romanoff visited Ms. Lim’s birthing clinic earlier this year, documenting their efforts to provide services in a region where infrastructure has fallen apart. See more images from this series on the Reportage website.

GlobalPost’s Erin Conway-Smith reports from Pretoria, South Africa:

The lights went down and miners in helmets and gumboots rose up from a dark pit beneath the stage, headlamps aglow, singing a rousing song of struggle.

The packed crowd of hip young South Africans whooped and cheered. It was opening night of “Marikana: The Musical” at the country’s most stately theater, an unlikely tribute to a tragedy still fresh in the minds of many here.

Two years ago, South African police shot dead 34 striking mineworkers at the Lonmin-owned Marikana platinum mine northwest of Johannesburg. It was the bloodiest police action since the end of apartheid, and a day that shocked the nation. An official inquiry into these deaths, and 10 others during the unrest, continues.

Read on here.

GlobalPost’s Ambika Kandasamy writes:

Thousands of Syrian refugees are streaming over the Turkish border this week after their towns were overrun by Islamic State militants. And millions more are enduring a brutally violent civil war, which has killed more than 191,000 civilians and displaced more than three million people from their homes, according to data from the United Nations.

In the 150 years since the signing of the first Geneva Convention, which laid the groundwork for international humanitarian laws, the world has only become more dangerous for both civilians and the humanitarian aid workers helping them.

That’s according to Martin Dahinden, director of the Swiss Development Agency in the Department of Foreign Affairs and designated Swiss ambassador to the United States. 

"The number of civilian victims is frighteningly high, regardless of whether we look at the conflicts in and around Syria or elsewhere," Dahinden said during a recent talk at Tufts University’s Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. 

Dahinden also discussed the War from the Victims’ Perspective photo exhibit featuring works by Jean Mohr, a Swiss photographer who documented lives of victims in conflict regions around the world, at the talk, which was co-organized by swissnex Boston.

At first glance, the timelessness of Mohr’s photos are striking and unsettling – the photo of a woman seated beside a row of tents near Larnaca, Cyprus in 1974 is reminiscent of a photo of a Ukrainian refugee seated beside a row of tents near Donetsk, Ukraine in 2014.

Read the full piece here: 150 years after Geneva Convention, it’s worse than ever for civilians

Photo (L) by Ambika Kandasamy/GlobalPost

Photo (R) by Dmitry Serebryakov AFP/Getty Images

The Toxic Price of Leather from Sean Gallagher on Vimeo.

pulitzercenter:

The city of Kanpur lies on the banks of the Ganges River in northern India. It has become one of the most important cities in India as its leather industry has grown.

First established in the mid-19th century, Kanpur is now the country’s biggest producer of leather products. Its leather is exported across the world, with 95 percent of its output destined for Western markets including those in the US, UK and Germany.

The success comes at great environmental and social cost. Pollution from the tanneries is destroying the ecology of the local Ganges River and scarring residents in the form of life-threatening illnesses.

The city is now notorious for having some of the country’s worst water pollution problems yet the tannery industry continues to discharge waste water laced with toxic chemicals, such as chromium, freely into local waterways.

This water is channeled onto local farmland, poisoning the soil, entering the food chain and accumulating in local ecosystems. At greatest risk are the people who work in the tanneries and farmers who work daily with the toxic and highly acidic water.

Local residents suffer an array of health troubles, a result of the bioaccumulation of dangerous toxins over decades. Health problems include cancers, mental illness, child development issues and skin diseases.

View Pulitzer Center grantee Sean Gallagher’s full project: Toxic Development: The Cost of Pollution in India

Brutal, unforgiving violence has touched everyone in Malakal, a town that’s seen the worst of South Sudan’s civil war.

Read GlobalPost senior correspondent Tristan McConnell’s dispatch from Malakal, South Sudan.

Photos: Tristan McConnell/South Sudan

"On the seventh day of non-violent protest in Hong Kong, violence erupted," GlobalPost’s Benjamin Carlson writes. “Despite protesters’ fears that a crackdown would come again in the form of tear gas and pepper spray from police, it was ultimately fellow citizens who attacked, tearing down fliers, tents, and encampments, and in some cases beating the students themselves.”

Read the full story here

Photo: Chris McGrath/Getty Images

nprglobalhealth:

A Glimmer Of Hope: Nigeria May Have Beaten Ebola
School is back in session. And President Goodluck Jonathan has given a victory speech.
It’s a rare upbeat Ebola story: Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, may have contained its outbreak after only 19 confirmed cases and seven related deaths.
The outbreak began in July. But the country hasn’t seen a new case since Aug. 31, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. All but threeof the 900 people who had contacts with Ebola patients have passed the 21-day incubation period without showing any symptoms of the disease. The last three will complete their incubation period by today’s end.
"Although Nigeria isn’t completely out of the woods, their extensive response to a single case of Ebola shows that control is possible with rapid, focused interventions," CDC Director Tom Frieden said in a statement.
A region or country is considered Ebola-free after 42 days without any new cases. That means Nigeria can formally declare success on Oct. 12, which would truly be cause for celebration.
The country is home to 170 million people, so the potential for Ebola to spread quickly was high. Nigeria is also a major transport hub; millions of passengers pass through the international airport in Lagos every year.
Continue reading.
Photo: Secondary students learn about Ebola during an assembly in Abuja. Nigeria’s schools have reopened after being closed to prevent the spread of the disease. (AFP/Getty Images)

nprglobalhealth:

A Glimmer Of Hope: Nigeria May Have Beaten Ebola

School is back in session. And President Goodluck Jonathan has given a victory speech.

It’s a rare upbeat Ebola story: Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, may have contained its outbreak after only 19 confirmed cases and seven related deaths.

The outbreak began in July. But the country hasn’t seen a new case since Aug. 31, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. All but threeof the 900 people who had contacts with Ebola patients have passed the 21-day incubation period without showing any symptoms of the disease. The last three will complete their incubation period by today’s end.

"Although Nigeria isn’t completely out of the woods, their extensive response to a single case of Ebola shows that control is possible with rapid, focused interventions," CDC Director Tom Frieden said in a statement.

A region or country is considered Ebola-free after 42 days without any new cases. That means Nigeria can formally declare success on Oct. 12, which would truly be cause for celebration.

The country is home to 170 million people, so the potential for Ebola to spread quickly was high. Nigeria is also a major transport hub; millions of passengers pass through the international airport in Lagos every year.

Continue reading.

Photo: Secondary students learn about Ebola during an assembly in Abuja. Nigeria’s schools have reopened after being closed to prevent the spread of the disease. (AFP/Getty Images)