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At least one person was killed in the violent protests that shook the Pavao-Pavaozinho favela, near Rio de Janeiro’s famous Copacabana beach.

Demonstrators set fire to barricades made of tires and threw bottles to protest the death of Douglas Rafael da Silva Pereira, a dancer.

Da Silva Pereira’s friends alleged that he was caught in the middle of a shoot-out between police and drug traffickers on Monday. They said he was beaten to death. Police told Agence France-Presse that they believed evidence showed he died in a fall.

A dancer’s death lit the fuse of violent protests near Rio’s Copacabana

Photos by AFP/Getty Images


April 23rd — and source with 12 notes

CAIRO, Egypt — It might seem crazy what I’m about to say. The Middle East is “happy.”

At least, that’s what groups of mainly young people across the region are saying as they produce video tributes to Pharrell Williams’ hit song by that name.

“Happy,” featuring Williams’ impossibly smooth vocals, a catchy melody, and defiantly upbeat, redemptive message, inspired a worldwide outpouring of fan videos following its release last November.

The Middle East and North Africa region has been no exception to the craze. 

Yes, you can be ‘happy’ like Pharrell Williams — even if you’re in Gaza

Photo collage from YouTube


Years after the Obama administration announced a “deliberate and strategic decision” to pivot to Asia, the US president is trying to revive the foreign policy initiative with a trip to Japan, South Korea, Malaysia and the Philippines.

As President Barack Obama headed to his first stop — Japan — reports emerged that nearly 150 Japanese lawmakers had visited the controversial Yasukuni shrine on Tuesday, a move that could potentially raise tensions with neighbors China and South Korea. 

The shrine honors those who gave their lives fighting for Japan. But more controversially, it also enshrines several war criminals executed found guilty of “crimes against peace” in the Tokyo trials following World War II.

Did Japanese lawmakers intend to provoke Obama by honoring war criminals?

Photos by AFP/Getty Images


JERUSALEM — In the last year, fewer Israelis were killed by terrorist attacks than at any point since the outbreak of the second intifada. But as Palestinian terrorism has receded, bombings haven’t stopped. In fact, they may be increasing.

This time the perpetrators aren’t jihadists, but rather much more technologically advanced organized crime groups. Israelis are discovering the drawbacks of a society where everyone serves in the army: a whole lot of citizens know how to use explosives.

In October of last year, a known criminal living in the northern Israeli city of Haifa was gunned down in an underground parking garage. Three days later in Ashkelon, in the south, a powerful car bomb shook the buildings downtown, gravely injuring two alleged associates of the Domrani crime family who were inside the vehicle. One later died of his wounds.

These were the opening shots fired in a mob war that has been raging throughout Israel for much of the last six months.

Israel’s nightmare: Mobsters with the tactics of terrorists and the tools of the Israeli army

Photo by AFP/Getty Images


April 23rd — and source with 9 notes

theatlantic:

An Israeli and Palestinian, Brought Together By Breast Cancer

"We are not the ones at war," Ibtisam told me. "It’s our governments, not us."

Read more. [Image: Yitz Woolf]


April 23rdvia and with 155 notes

reuterspictures:

Gallery: Russia’s kid cadets

The General Yermolov Cadet School is a state-run institution that teaches military and patriotic classes in addition to a normal syllabus. The school, outside the south Russian city of Stavropol, allows its pupils to take part in field-training trips, during which they spend time at a base and undergo physical drills and weapons training. The outings are seen as a treat for students, and those with bad grades are not allowed to go. The school is named after the Russian imperial general Alexei Yermolov and many of its students are from military backgrounds. REUTERS/Eduard Korniyenko


April 22ndvia and with 72 notes

awkwardsituationist:

by pairing skate lessons and boards with education initiatives, skateistan — a non profit organization that works with the support of local afghan communities — is using skateboarding as a tool of empowerment for more than four hundred afghan kids, many of whom live on the streets.  

more than 40 percent of skateistan’s students are female. though girls are banned from riding bikes in afghanistan, skateboarding is novel and remains permissible, and has now become the most popular sport for females in the country. 

photos from skateistan’s facebook and instagram (see also: skating in uganda)


April 22ndvia and source with 2,145 notes

WEIRD WEATHER HITS AMERICA’S BREADBASKET


WATERLESS WORLD: CHINA’S EVER-EXPANDING DESERT WASTELAND


ICE, ICE MELTING


WARMING SEAS AND SUPER-STORMS RAZE THE CRADLE OF AQUATIC LIFE AND HARM THE LIVELIHOODS OF COASTAL DWELLERS


HOW CLIMATE CHANGE IS HELPING AL QAEDA


HIMALAYAN TSUNAMI: CLIMATE CHANGE TRIGGERS DEADLY FLOODS AMONG THE WORLD’S HIGHEST PEAKS


buzzfeed:

In honor of Earth Day, here are some stunning pictures of our beautiful world as seen from space.


April 22ndvia and with 1,506 notes

HOW CLIMATE CHANGE IS DESTROYING CANCUN AND THREATENING BEACHES WORLDWIDE








HG